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Emotional Creature Opens Today in Cape Town!

Eve Ensler's Emotional Creature opens today,
6 August in Cape Town! Directed by Jo Bonney, with music & music direction by Charl-Johan Lingenfelder.

Emotional Creature will run at the Baxter Theatre Center from 6 – 16 August.

Celebrate your emotional creature and join the all South African cast as they dance, sing and share the heartbreak and thrills of being young and alive in the world today!

Venue: Baxter Theatre Flipside, Main Rd, Rondebosch, Cape Town
Time: Mon – Fri @ 11am & 6.30pm,
Sat @ 2pm & 6.30 pm
Buy tickets here >

READ:
- Full Press Release >
- "Emotional Creature: It's a girl thing" (Mail & Guardian) >
- "Women's Month: Women's Bodies As A Landscape Of Trauma" (Daily Maverick) >
- "Emotional Creature is heartbreaking and hopeful" (Artslink) >

For discounted block bookings, charities, corporate bookings and fundraisers please contact Sharon Ward on 021 680 3962, e-mail sharon.ward@uct.ac.za or Carmen Kearns on 021 680 3993, e-mail carmen.kearns@uct.ac.za.


Suzanne Blue Star Boy Remembers Women's Leader Tillie Black Bear

The anti-violence movement was saddened to learn that the founder of the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center, Tillie Black Bear, had passed on. V-Day had the honor of working with Black Bear in 2003 when she served as an advisor to the Indian Country Project alongside other Native American elders on the Kitchen Cabinet board.

The Indian Country Project's leader and Native Women's Activist, Suzanne Blue Star Boy, has shared the following statement of remembrance:

I had been aware of Tillie's work since I was a young woman living in South Dakota on the Yankton Sioux Reservation. Tillie lived about three hours away on the Rosebud Reservation. She became the face and founder of the Native anti-domestic violence movement in 1978 when she testified to congress about the prevalence of domestic violence in Indian Country at the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights thus establishing herself as the Grandmother of the Battered Women's Movement. As she spoke, I thought to myself "who is this incredible Lakota woman?" Little did I know that she would one day be my guide, my mentor, my auntie.

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